Making the transition from Web 2.0 to Web 2.007

Making the transition from Web 2.0 to Web 2.007

The transition from Microsoft Windows XP to Vista, and from cell phones to iPhones, mimics the cultural transition we’ve already made from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 – and beyond.
When Tim O’Reilly coined the term Web 2.0 in 2004, the Internet was still “a place for people to go.” Now, it’s what he imagined: a place where people are. It has become integrated into our daily lives, to the point where we collaborate with others. It has also become a place where our electronics and appliances collaborate on our behalf.
Data dictation
The term Web 2.0 was used by O’Reilly to imply a new, improved version of the web. In Web 2.0, websites have merged with computer applications and content has been separated from individual websites. It’s all about the data: accessing data, sharing data, and distributing data.
My home computer has a digital video recorder. The digital video recorder connected to my home computer pulls TV listings as a data feed from the Titan TV website. From work, I can browse the TV listings on the Titan TV website and click on the TV shows that I want my home computer to record.
After recording the TV shows, the digital video recorder on my home computer reformats the TV shows so they can be viewed using my iPod.
When I plug in my iPod, the recorded TV shows are automatically loaded for viewing, along with several audio podcasts such as This American Life. Everything I care to listen to and view is automatically at my fingertips. Everything I own seems to be connected to everything else I own with only a few degrees of separation.
That’s Web 2.0. My computer has become more accessible to you than Kevin Bacon.
Web 2.007
We’ve already moved beyond Web 2.0. This year it’s Web 2.007. It’s the version where we begin to embrace the changes that Web 2.0 offers and determine what needs to be part of the next major release – whatever that is. In version 2.007, for example, marketers will learn how to use blogs, podcasts, RSS feeds, search engines, and related technologies to improve their efforts. The technology will be used to build a loyal community of customers and to meet the individual needs of every user simultaneously.
In forthcoming versions of the web, we’ve been promised ways to search images, video, and audio that rival the ways we search text files today. We’ve been promised more integration, more security, more access, more participation, and more data.
Wikipedia, a product of Web 2.0 and its users, suggests that Web 3.0 will be realized when computers have enough artificial intelligence to help us navigate, manage, and use the ocean of data we’re creating without human direction.
How long will it take to fulfill these promises? Microsoft Vista was five years in the making. During that time, software titles – especially ones we depended on – came and went. Others were vaporware and never came at all.
The trick is to keep our eyes on Web 2.007 and all the minor updates that have a big influence on how we do things today.
Recent articles by Troy Janisch
Troy Janisch: Viewing the Internet as a free-for-all can be costly
Troy Janisch: It takes more than money to reach the top
Troy Janisch: Getting the most from Google dayparts
Troy Janisch: Risks and returns: Building a search engine marketing portfolio
Troy Janisch: Search engine optimization: What’s the word?

Troy Janisch is president and founder of the Icon Interactive Group (www.iconinteractive.com), an industry leader helping companies integrate Internet and other Interactive media into sales channels, marketing strategies, and overall branding. He can be contacted by e-mail at tjanisch@iconinteractive.com.
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